@ Home With Joy

where staying home is so much fun!

The Moments In My Life

Okay, this page was blank for such a long time already. I don’t even remember my log-in details when I try to visit. Shame on me. What happened? You may be asking. Well, well, a lot of things. Can we now forget about it and let me start writing? Oh! Thank you.

I do a lot of research on the web about many things. For one, there’s home organization. I can’t perform, I can’t accomplish much, I can’t focus when there’s clutter, dirt, mess around. So I linger for a while…. then, I do a lot of cleaning, organizing, and boom! Yeah, I was able to clean and organize some parts of my house but …. I still need to teach in the evening, I still need to finish my husband’s website, I need to get to finish my online course and get a certification/diploma. By the way, I also need to prepare what would be for the “baon” of my kiddos, what’s for breakfast the next day, etc. etc. Then I would be so tired because I ended up my day almost around midnight already.

I didn’t apply and I didn’t want to get any virtual project for now because I’m in a mess and can’t organize myself. My last project was December of last year. Uhm, my fault? Yeah, I know because I want to accomplish and finish everything right away but ending up not finishing at all.

Then, I encountered this article entitled, “What The Buddhist Can Teach Us About Household Chores” by Dana Velden. It is the practice of an activity called ‘soji’. Soji is a Buddhist practice that for a period of 20 minutes the whole community participates in cleaning up the temple and its grounds. They are assigned a simple cleaning task (dry the dishes, clean the hallway, etc.) which they do silently and without ambition to finish. They will do the best job they possibly can until it’s time to stop, meaning the 20 minutes is over. If the hallway is only half swept, if there are still dishes to be dried – it doesn’t matter. They just put away their tools and move on to the next activity. (In their case, it’s breakfast!)

The article goes on to say – “So consider approaching some of the task in your life from the soji perspective. What would happen if it wasn’t so much about finishing but more about simply doing? What burdens can be put down when we redirect our energies not toward the goal but into the process itself, into each moment along the way? What treasures are waiting for us there?”

This is brilliant! So, the next time I find myself a task that really needs to get done, I’ll set the cellphone timer, will stay with it until the bell rings, and when it does, simply stop what I am doing. If it’s still undone, I’ll just relax and move on to my next activity. If I finish before the bell has rung, see if there isn’t a smaller task I can pick up for a while.

By framing my activity as soji, limiting the time, enjoying the activity, forgetting about the time as I plunge into it is a fantastic way to get things done, and it’s also a way to be present for all the moments in my life.

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